Tuktuk Day 117

The Way We Were …..

No, not the Barbara Streisand/Kris Kristofferson film soundtrack but, yes, a similar era. I was looking at a Blackpool programme from 1968 yesterday which had the marvellous Football Review inside. How I miss those days!

Anyway, there was a little quiz asking readers to name the kits. Just look how “plain” they are in those days. No logos, no crests, no betting companies ……no nothing! No fluorescent lime boots, no square metres of tattoos and not an agent or VAR in sight.

Just for fun, can you recognise these kits? A couple of hints No.2 is NOT Manchester United and No.3 is NOT Gillingham nor Chelsea nor Everton. No.4 is not Leeds United. I would be impressed if you got all four and even more impressed if you named the players.

Whilst talking about kits, I got an email from Brentford FC with an interesting twist on the “retro” trend.

Brentford and Bees United have created a version of the club’s first-ever striped shirt, worn in the 1890s.

The shirt, which has the same claret and blue colours from 1889, is now available for fans to purchase. It features a club crest that was in use during the 1893/94 season.

This release follows the launch of Brentford FC and Bees United’s 1889 heritage shirt, a version of the club’s first-ever playing kit, made available in March.

The shirt, which has the same claret and blue colours from 1889, is now available for fans to purchase. It features a club crest that was in use during the 1893/94 season.

This release follows the launch of Brentford FC and Bees United’s 1889 heritage shirt, a version of the club’s first-ever playing kit, made available in March.

This second heritage shirt marks the club’s shift from solid claret to claret and blue stripes in the 1890s.

While the reasons for Brentford’s choice of design are not known, stripes were only made possible in the late 1880s thanks to new technology and textile capability. Hoops had been commonplace, but stripes were brand new.

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